THE recent increase in government’s brutality against dissenting voices is nothing other than attempts by senior ruling Zanu PF officials in protecting their ill-gotten wealth accumulated over years of corrupt governance.

Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions (ZCTU) President Peter Mutasa told journalists Thursday that the government’s fight to keep their grip on power should be a mirror of how much the senior officials had stolen from Zimbabwe’s coffers and natural resources.

He was speaking at a Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition’s commemorations of the government’s 11 March 2007 clampdown on a “Save Zimbabwe” prayer session where armed anti-riot officers seriously injured the now late MDC leader Morgan Tsvangirai, constitutional expert Professor Lovemore Madhuku and others in Highfields, Harare.

The commemorations were held at the Media Centre in Harare.

It is expected that government will say there is no crisis (in Zimbabwe); the abusers will see peace because they are benefitting but their victims will be saying they cannot breathe,” said Mutasa.

“One thing that is central to this debacle is that they are not just defending political power, they are on steroids in terms of primitive accumulation, they are defending economic gains, their diamonds, gold claims, land; they are defending their ill-gotten wealth.

“They will not hand it over easily. If you think they are rich, they think they are not yet rich, if you think they are millionaires, they want to be billionaires. If you think they are billionaires, they want their kids to be millionaires. If you think their children are now billionaires, they want their grandchildren to be billionaires too.”

However, Mutasa, who spoke in the presence of MDC Alliance leader Nelson Chamisa and revered cleric Ancelimo Magaya said those fighting for a better Zimbabwe should not tire.

“We have no choice, it is a generational call, we need to be persistent, government is not going to give it on a silver platter.”

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